Infrastructure new Zealand MEDIA & RELEASES

Our media releases keep you up to date with the latest infrastructure developments in New Zealand.

<< First  < Prev   1   2   3   4   5   ...   Next >  Last >> 
  • 16 Apr 2019 3:30 PM | Anonymous

    Read Stephen Selwood's views on Auckland's Watercare taking over water services for a big chunk of the Waikato here.

  • 14 Apr 2019 12:30 PM | Anonymous

    MEDIA RELEASE

    “Public and private collaboration on the Construction Sector Accord and bi-partisan support for the establishment of the Infrastructure Commission will deliver major benefits for infrastructure and construction outcomes if cooperation can be sustained,” says Infrastructure New Zealand CEO Stephen Selwood.

    “The Construction Sector Accord announced today aims to transform the way the government and the construction industry work together and that transformation can’t come soon enough.

    “Uncertainty, skills shortages, injuries and contracting issues are making the construction sector a less attractive, productive and effective part of the economy. That’s bad for everyone, not least of all the Government because of the direct role construction plays in delivering public services.  

    “The Accord signals recognition that clients have a major impact on the way the industry behaves. What everyone wants is a healthy construction industry which competes across itself to deliver value, rather than competing with its clients.

    “That the Accord has been signed in the same week that legislation to establish the New Zealand Infrastructure Commission, Te Waihanga (NZIC), attracted support from all political parties is especially pleasing.

    “The NZIC will provide independent advice to the Government on infrastructure strategy and provide procurement support. It will develop a long awaited pipeline of public works which will give the industry greater clarity over future infrastructure programmes, priorities and investments.

    “This forward work programme is essential to providing the market with the confidence to invest in the skills, systems and equipment which are desperately required to improve New Zealand’s construction productivity.

    “But it must have bi-partisan support to succeed. New Zealand’s thee-year election cycle is too short for any one Government to reshape infrastructure policy.

    “There needs to be broader understanding and agreement over the long term opportunities and challenges so that, even if projects change in the short term, we as a country do not lose sight of the bigger picture.

    “We strongly commend the NZIC process to date which has enabled all political leaders to work together. The priority now is to sustain an open, transparent and collaborative process to finalise legislation and establish a respected, capable and independent infrastructure body,” Selwood says. 

    ENDS

    For further information and comment contact Stephen Selwood on 021 791 209

  • 11 Apr 2019 2:00 PM | Anonymous

    Legislation to establish the New Zealand Infrastructure Commission/Te Waihanga (the Commission) as an autonomous Crown entity, with the purpose of coordinating, developing, and promoting an approach to infrastructure that encourages infrastructure, and services that result from the infrastructure, that improve the well-being of New Zealanders is open for public feedback until May 17.

    Reading Video 1 Link
    Reading Video 2 Link
    Reading Video 3 Link
    Reading Video 4 Link

  • 08 Mar 2019 3:47 PM | Anonymous
    CEO Stephen Selwood discusses the Roads vs Public Transport debate. Read the article here.
  • 08 Mar 2019 8:26 AM | Anonymous

    MEDIA RELEASE

    Given the widely publicised capacity constraints in the infrastructure sector, it is no surprise that a shortage of skills tops the list of the most critical challenges facing the industry. To address this challenge and attract a workforce fit for the future, ‘the infrastructure industry needs to be seen as a welcoming place that is diverse and inclusive, valuing wellbeing, innovation and career progression’, says Stephen Selwood, CEO Infrastructure NZ.

    ‘On International Womens’ Day, Infrastructure NZ is proud to acknowledge the large number of our member organisations leading the way in making their businesses welcoming, diverse and inclusive’ says Selwood. 

    Selwood gives specifc recognition to the New Zealand Defence Force, Winners of the DiversityWorks Supreme Award for their Operation Respect programme, for creating a safe work culture for all staff.  Fletcher Building, also a category winner, was awarded for their innovative solution for sourcing and selecting young employees to manage labour shortages, and give NZ youth a chance at a career.

    ‘Other Infrastructure NZ members such as Transdev, Auckland Council, Auckland Transport, CPB Contractors, Westpac, Aecom, ANZ, GHD, HSBC, KPMG, KiwiRail, Spark, Transpower and Vector were also highly commended in the DiversityWorks Awards for their proactivity in driving inclusive cultures throughout their organisations’, notes Selwood. 

    ‘We are delighted to see the leadership and commitment to future proofing the industry being demonstrated by our members.

    ‘By embracing diversity in its widest sense – recognising that differences in gender, ethnicity, age and providing opportunities for all regardless of difference or disability – is not just about providing equal opportunities for all, it is vital to addressing the skills and capability gap across the sector, and understanding the needs of the people that we serve.

    Infrastructure NZ itself has been working hard to increase the gender diversity of the industry through the establishment of the Women’s Infrastructure Network (WIN) which now has 1300 members, spread across 7 chapters nationwide. Sponsored by Citycare, Beca and Kensington Swan, WIN aims to increase the visibility of women in the infrastructure sector, grow the number of women in leadership roles and support those women already working in the sector. A recent survey of women in the infrastructure industry shows a high level of support for the WIN Network and chapters across the country.

    Additionally, in the same survey, Infrastructure NZ was encouraged to find that

    • 82% of organisations had goals to increase the representation of women
    • 45% of organisations actively promoted flexible working arrangements, and another 36% accept flexible working arrangements
    • 42% of organisations had undertaken some initiatives to address pay parity
    • 17% of respondents felt that there were excellent opportunities for career growth and progression in the infrastructure industry, 39% good opportunities and 39% moderate opportunities.

    ‘But, despite these successes, there is more work to do and we cannot remain complacent’, says Selwood.

    In the same survey, women of the infrastructure industry identified key barriers to progressing in the sector including; the male dominated industry, unconscious bias, few role models and a macho company culture.

    Respondents felt that the best ways for overcoming these barriers included: changes to policies, the establishment of Womens’ networks, mentoring, providing role models and weeding out unconscious bias.

    As a member of DiversityWorks, Infrastructure NZ is a strong advocate of member organisations developing diverse and inclusive workplaces by publicising clear targets and metrics on diversity, prioritising action and reporting externally to stakeholders. 

    ‘We want the infrastructure sector to be the industry of choice’, says Selwood ‘and the home of the best and brightest minds.’

    ENDS

    For further information and comment contact Stephen Selwood on 021 791 209


  • 22 Feb 2019 3:57 PM | Anonymous

    At the current rate of women gaining parity with men in the workplace, it will take 278 years before full equality is reached.

    Read the article here.

  • 20 Feb 2019 2:00 PM | Anonymous

    MEDIA RELEASE

    “The announcement that the Government will establish the New Zealand Infrastructure Commission – Te Waihanga – to perform strategy and procurement functions and vest it with sufficient independence to have mana and influence is very strongly welcomed by the infrastructure industry,” says Stephen Selwood CEO of Infrastructure New Zealand.

    “The Commission will develop a broad consensus on long-term strategy, enable coordination of infrastructure planning and provide advice and best practice support to infrastructure initiatives.

    “That it will be an Autonomous Crown Entity and not a department of government is especially pleasing. Independence is vital to ensuring the Commission can form its own views on infrastructure matters and build political and public consensus on New Zealand’s infrastructure needs and investment priorities.

    “New Zealand has a track record of underinvestment, particularly in transport, water and social infrastructure.

    “Failures in planning, funding and delivering services in a timely way have led to congestion in our growing cities, unaffordable houses, water shortages, boil water notices, polluted water bodies, leaky schools and hospitals and weak resilience to climate change and natural hazards.

    “The Commission will lead thinking on these and other important public policy issues to help identify and coordinate solutions. It will provide transparency of the infrastructure pipeline and promote integration of infrastructure and development.

    “It will also assist in project delivery. We often take for granted how difficult it is to plan, fund, purchase and deliver a multi-billion project consisting of multiple contracts over many years in a way which produces a single, coherent and effective service.

    “Specialists at the Infrastructure Commission will provide councils, DHBs and other public agencies with the support and advice needed to engage the market, manage transparent and competitive tender processes and deliver best value solutions.

    “This is a fundamental and much needed change to the piecemeal way we have traditionally approached infrastructure analysis, investment and delivery in New Zealand.

    “Poor, changeable and unpredictable project sequencing and procurement is destabilising the industry. The result is underutilisation of highly skilled staff and the loss of critical skills overseas – the same skills desperately needed to address New Zealand’s agreed infrastructure backlog.

    “The Infrastructure Commission will not – and should not – be able to prevent changes in policy, but, by interfacing with the market and major clients, it will be able to influence policy through an understanding of broad sector needs and issues.

    “We are very pleased that a comprehensive solution is now being put in place,” Selwood says.

    ENDS

    For further information and comment contact Stephen Selwood on 021 791 209


  • 11 Feb 2019 7:00 PM | Anonymous

    Read the article and listen to Stephen's interview here.

  • 11 Feb 2019 12:00 PM | Anonymous

    The roading sector fears lay-offs and a downturn in major contracts, as big-budget projects inherited from the previous government wind up. 

    Read the article here.

  • 31 Jan 2019 4:00 PM | Anonymous

    See level rise is putting billions of dollars of NZ council infrastructure at risk - so a new report put out by LGNZ says.

    Listen to Stephen's interview here.

<< First  < Prev   1   2   3   4   5   ...   Next >  Last >> 

Copyright © 2017 - Infrastructure New Zealand  |  Privacy  |  Contact Us

Powered by Wild Apricot Membership Software